Should I Appeal My Case Criminal Case if I Get Convicted?

It seems that everyone that gets convicted of a crime wants to appeal their case.  Should they and when?  You cannot appeal your case until after your sentencing and you must file it within thirty (30) days after your sentencing and it must be in writing (either by you or an attorney).  You should appeal […]

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What Happens at a Criminal Sentencing?

So the defendant is found guilty in a criminal trial — by either a judge or a jury — now what?  In Pennsylvania, the jury does not participate in the sentencing except in death penalty cases.  Hence, in all other cases, the defendant is at the mercy of the judge who presided over the trial […]

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You Need the Best Criminal Defense Attorney for a Great Closing Argument

How important is the closing argument in a criminal trial?  Extremely, other than cross examination, it is the most important part of the criminal trial for the defendant (in my humble opinion obviously since there is no right or wrong answer to all of this).  While first impressions, i.e., the opening arguments, are always very […]

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How Helpful are Alibi Witnesses in a Criminal Trial?

You have seen and heard it often in movies, television, and in real life:  the defendant couldn’t have done the crime because he was not there and he has alibi witnesses as proof.  Well, how persuasive are alibi witnesses in a criminal cases?  The first thing to remember is that alibi witnesses is just one […]

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When Should the Defendant take the Stand in a Criminal Trial?

It is not always an easy decision to make on whether or not the defendant should take the stand in a criminal trial.  First, who makes the decision?  Well, ultimately the defendant decides since it is his trial, but in my experience they almost always do what their attorney suggests since they have the necessary […]

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Why O.J. Simpson Didn’t Help Himself at his Parole Hearing

O.J. Simpson was recently granted parole and will be released from prison on October 1st, 2017 after serving nine years of incarceration for armed robbery.  Simpson had by all accounts been a model prisoner — he had no negative incidents and he helped out fellow prisoners.  This was the main reason that the parole board […]

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What is a Motion for Directed Verdict in a Criminal Trial?

A Motion for a Directed Verdict (“Motion”) is asking the court (i.e., the judge) to issue a Directed Verdict in favor of the defense This motion is made before a case is submitted to the jury, and argues that no reasonable jury could find for the opposing party (i.e., whatever evidence exists for such ruling is […]

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What is Fair in Kamala Harris Cross Examination Controversy?

As I watched some of the recent Senate Hearings, a Senator from California and a former District Attorney and Democrat, Kamala Harris, caused some controversy twice.  Depending on your viewpoint, she either was rudely interrupted by white male colleagues (her mother is Tamil Indian and her father is Jamican-American) or she rudely interrupted the person […]

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Your Criminal Trial is Where the Best Criminal Defense Attorneys Shine

Learn How To Tell If Your Criminal Defense Attorney Is Doing A Great Job So, you’ve had your final Pretrial Conference and was given a trial date, now what?  Well, after all the motions (if any) are heard, your trial will begin.  If you have chosen a waiver or judge trial, opening arguments are almost […]

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What happens at your Final Pre-trial Conference?

The most important thing that happens at your final pre-trial conference is that you are given your trial date if one was not chosen earlier In Philadelphia, a judge or waive trial is usually only one or two months from that date, however, a jury trial can be three to twelve months away depending on […]

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